Student government meets to approve final spring budget

BY HANNAH CRITES

Staff Writer

Student Government met on April 16 to approve their final spring budget and to pass bills revising the Student Government Constitution.

They also met to allocate money to Stella Mariae woman’s household, the ROTC Club and Franciscan Effects.

Spring Bill 49 was a re-allocation of $520 to the ROTC club for their commissioning ceremony at the end of the semester. The president of the club was present as a representative. The bill passed with little discussion due to the money already being allocated and because ROTC rarely comes to Student Government with requests.

Spring Bill 51 was a request from Stella Mariae to allocate $200 to the household for their 15th-year reunion on April 4 through April 6. The treasurer was present to represent the household. The bill was originally requested for $600, but Student Government lowered it to the requested $200.

The Senate was split on whether the funds should be given to them because Stella Mariae is a household and not a club. Student Government hasn’t given funds to a household in two years. Many senators were worried if the bill were passed, it would open a door for other households to write bills.

The senate was split evenly on whether to pass the bill so the vote was moved to the chair to decide. The chair abstained from voting and the bill failed.

In his president’s comments at the end of the meeting, Joe Danaher wanted to make it clear to those present that denying Stella funds did not mean that Student Government didn’t care about households. However, it could “jeopardize student government’s ability to serve clubs.”

Spring Bill 50 allocated $112.15 to Franciscan University Effects, Franciscan’s student run radio program. However, the radio program failed to send a representative from the club, so the bill was tabled. The money would have been used to purchase promotional stickers.

Spring Bill 53 and 54 requested to change Article 6, Section 4 and Article 10, Sections 2 and 3. The Senate passed the bills unanimously with little discussion.

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